Biggest Dead Zone Ever in Gulf of Mexico Now

RSOE Report –

“A recent expedition to the Gulf of Mexico has yielded the largest ‘dead zone’ ever recorded in the area. Measuring 8,776 square miles, this massive patch of oxygen depleted water is wreaking havoc on the Gulf’s marine life – a consequence of unchecked agricultural runoff pouring down from the Mississippi River. Dead zones appear in the Gulf every summer, and the typical size is around 5,800 square miles. Back in 2002, scientists detected an unusually large dead zone stretching for 8,497 square miles, but this new one, detected just last week, is now the largest ever recorded. At a whopping 8,776 square miles (22,730 sq km), it’s 4.6 times larger than the target size set by the Gulf Hypoxia Task Force. In the words of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, this finding shows that “nutrient pollution, primarily from agriculture and developed land runoff in the Mississippi River watershed is continuing to affect the nation’s coastal resources and habitats in the Gulf.” Hypoxia is a fancy term for low oxygen, and it’s primarily a problem for estuaries and coastal waters . . . . “  (more)

MAP

Arctic Methane Explosion Craters Discovered on Seafloor

We follow this frozen methane news since there’s a huge amount of it in the Gulf of Mexico – F.C.

Massive blow-out craters formed by hydrate-controlled methane expulsion from the Arctic seafloor

Like ‘champagne bottles being opened’: Scientists document an ancient Arctic methane explosion

“Scientists generally believe that the methane leaking from these seeps never makes it to the surface of the ocean, instead dissolving in the water on its way up. But some suggest that an explosion, of the type described in Thursday’s paper, could produce enough force to send some gas straight up to the surface and into the atmosphere, with potentially climate-warming consequences. . . . “
How about the explosion risk? Page 4 of this science paper shows a Louisiana map with all the seeps.

Plus the methane at Bayou Corne was thought by some to be from the Gulf of Mexico … not from decaying vegetation like Texas Brine claims.

SEE ALSO – the Methane Page

Infrastructure Issue and the Sinkhole Saga + News

We are  covering a dam about-to-fail story in California on the FC blog. There have been many stories in the news since about the problems looming nationwide from aged, crumbling infrastructure.
One thing there popping up is info on weathered rock being more brittle than deep, protected rock.

We wonder if these salt dome storage caverns’ age has anything to do with their integrity.

We also wonder why inexpensive camera drones aren’t used for flying over Lake FUBAR to inspect it.

 

The Advocate Across Louisiana, crumbling infrastructure threatens small town water supplies

The Advocate is focusing on water issues –

NEWS

This sounds not-too-smart –

Drill baby drill: Japanese scientists hope to reach the Earth’s mantle in massive borehole project

World News – More Methane, More Sinkholes

Mar. 15 Russia –
50 m (164 feet) wide sinkhole opens in Bashkiria, Russia

Strange Sounds –
From Canada to Siberia, permafrost thaw produces ‘hell’s mouth’ craters, sinking lands, and 7,000 methane pockets ready to blow

NASA ‘Detergent’ Molecules May Drive Recent Methane Changes

John Barry on the coastal wetlands of Louisiana (video) + NEWS

LINK –  http://youtu.be/CeF8dJE0hqY

The Advocate Proposed pipeline highlights legacy of problems in Atchafalaya Basin
BY RICHARD BURGESS

The pipeline would run 163 miles across south Louisiana, from Lake Charles through the Atchafalaya Basin to St. James Parish, bridging a gap between oil refineries in Louisiana and a major oil and gas hub in Texas.”

MAP

Scientists discover ‘jacuzzi of death’ under the Gulf of Mexico

Gads!

Scientists recently discovered a secret, otherworldly “brine pool” at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. But while it might look enticing and magical, you definitely don’t want to go scuba diving in it.

“It’s warm, but super-salty,” biogeochemist Scott Wankel told the science website Seeker, adding that its 65-degree temperature often lures poor, unsuspecting crabs and other bottom feeders looking for food. “When they fall in, they die and get pickled and preserved.”

The so-called “Jacuzzi of despair” — located 3,300 feet underwater — is a surprisingly pretty “living mat of bacteria and salt deposits.” The water contained within the brine pool’s perimeter is about four to five times saltier than the surrounding gulf, creating a killer solution that forms an “underwater cauldron of toxic chemicals,” including methane gas and hydrogen sulfide. . .  (more)

http://nypost.com/2016/11/01/scientists-discover-jacuzzi-of-death-under-the-gulf-of-mexico/

MORE –  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3895610/The-bottomless-jacuzzi-despair-kills-swims-Researchers-reveal-massive-brine-pool-coast-New-Orleans.html

Is it related to all that ordinance dumped in the Gulf by the military after WWII?

 

 

Offshore Windfarms Can Greatly Reduce Hurricane Windspeed and Storm Surge by Absorbing Kinetic Energy from Winds

M.A. said “…this is really serious. It could save the New Orleans area by reducing storm surge by 79%. I think that the wind farm would need to be off the Mississippi coast but maybe it’s still the toe of the boot in Louisiana. It is worthy of a reblog so people can start talking, especially with Katrina anniversary (and Camille).”

Mining Awareness +


Gale force winds trees CDC
High winds radiate out from the center and gale force winds arrive ahead of the hurricane force winds.
Camille August 14-22, 1969 summary intro
Hurricane Camille, August 14-22 1969, made landfall on the Mississippi Gulf Coast around midnight August 17th-18th. (190 mph = 306 km/h, 30 ft = 9 m).
Camille August 14-22, 1969 while in the Gulf on Aug 16
Hurricane Katrina Gulf 2005
Hurricane Katrina, August 23 – 31, 2005
Camille Boat House Aug. 1969

Excerpts from “Taming hurricanes with arrays of offshore wind turbines
Mark Z. Jacobson1*, Cristina L. Archer2 and Willett Kempton3, Nature Climate Change, Vol. 4, March 2014, funded by the NSF and NASA:
Hurricanes are causing increasing damage to many coastal regions worldwide1,2. Offshore wind turbines can provide substantial clean electricity year-round,…
This study quantitatively tests whether large arrays of wind turbines installed offshore in front of major cities and along key coastal areas can extract sufficient kinetic energy from hurricane winds to reduce wind speed and storm surge, thus preventing damage to coastal structures…

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