Offshore Windfarms Can Greatly Reduce Hurricane Windspeed and Storm Surge by Absorbing Kinetic Energy from Winds

M.A. said “…this is really serious. It could save the New Orleans area by reducing storm surge by 79%. I think that the wind farm would need to be off the Mississippi coast but maybe it’s still the toe of the boot in Louisiana. It is worthy of a reblog so people can start talking, especially with Katrina anniversary (and Camille).”

Mining Awareness +


Gale force winds trees CDC
High winds radiate out from the center and gale force winds arrive ahead of the hurricane force winds.
Camille August 14-22, 1969 summary intro
Hurricane Camille, August 14-22 1969, made landfall on the Mississippi Gulf Coast around midnight August 17th-18th. (190 mph = 306 km/h, 30 ft = 9 m).
Camille August 14-22, 1969 while in the Gulf on Aug 16
Hurricane Katrina Gulf 2005
Hurricane Katrina, August 23 – 31, 2005
Camille Boat House Aug. 1969

Excerpts from “Taming hurricanes with arrays of offshore wind turbines
Mark Z. Jacobson1*, Cristina L. Archer2 and Willett Kempton3, Nature Climate Change, Vol. 4, March 2014, funded by the NSF and NASA:
Hurricanes are causing increasing damage to many coastal regions worldwide1,2. Offshore wind turbines can provide substantial clean electricity year-round,…
This study quantitatively tests whether large arrays of wind turbines installed offshore in front of major cities and along key coastal areas can extract sufficient kinetic energy from hurricane winds to reduce wind speed and storm surge, thus preventing damage to coastal structures…

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Continental Crack Story < UPDATED

Anyone who finds a link to this study comment here ….

UPDATE is SCARY!

Nature Runs Amok at Yellowstone

We cannot verify this study mentioned – FC

Bended Reality – Scientists Found a 1,700 Mile Crack Across the USA. Here’s What You Need to Know

LOS ANGELES, CA (California Network) – In Nov 1981, a study was published that rocked the scientific world, and sparked concern in FEMA circles, in which a 1,700 mile “Crack Across America” was discovered. Worse yet, this crack cuts through the New Madrid Seismic Zone, where in 1811 and 1812 three giant earthquakes devastatingly struck the center of America. Scientists have been struggling, since then, to answer the question of what risk this mega feature may pose to our heartland today. Recently, and less known, is a study from an independent geologic research set of work [2], that has identified a possible second “Crack Through America” that crosses into and through the same volatile New Madrid Seismic Zone. . .  (more)

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New Sea Floor Maps

On the Gulf of Mexico

New seafloor map reveals thousands of seamounts

 Vast unexplored areas of the ocean have now been mapped with new satellite data and scientists have discovered thousands of previously uncharted seamounts in addition to an extinct spreading ridge in the Gulf of Mexico.

Seamounts, which are at least 1,000 meters (3,200 feet) in height, were also prominent (not in the Gulf)  features in the new map,

NOAA Gulf of Mexico Map Tools (many).

Here are just a few:

Computer-enhanced multibeam bathymetry map of the northwestern and northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf and slope.

West Flower Garden Bank in GOM

Bright Bank, and underwater salt dome on the continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico

 

On the Seafloor, Global

New maps from Scripps Institution of Oceanography: New Map Exposes Previously Unseen Details of Seafloor

This map shows the spreading rift (Africa to South Asia)

3 plates merge at the Indian Ocean

The map set

Hey, Sandia! Supercomputer Available for Earth Sciences Studies

UW Faculty Have Until May 22 to Apply for Supercomputer Use

May 4, 2016 — University of Wyoming faculty members have the opportunity to apply for a large allocation to use computational and storage resources at the National Center for Atmospheric Science (NCAR)-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) in Cheyenne to support their research in earth systems and atmospheric sciences. Applications are due May 22.

Any request for more than 200,000 core hours is considered a large request. UW’s current share of the NWSC resource is 75 million core hours. This share of core hours will more than double next year. One core hour is the equivalent of running one application on a single computer for one hour. Since October, UW researchers have used 30.5 million core hours and, in February, six projects were allocated 42 million core hours…..”  (more)

http://www.uwyo.edu/uw/news/2016/05/uw-faculty-have-until-may-22-to-apply-for-supercomputer-use.html

They could study Lake FUBAR. Or they could modernize studies on the worthiness of salt dome storage caverns.  USGS, Sandia Labs … could contact some prof. there to put together a study. 

Methane Occurrence and Outbursts in Salt (and other) Mines: One More Reason that Deep Burial of Nuclear Waste is a Bad Idea

This relates to Lake FUBAR ….

” The US government’s apparently blinkered Blue Ribbon commission still has salt domes and salt beds on its hit list of places to stuff nuclear waste using the excuse that it was recommended in the 1950s. “

Mining Awareness +

The WIPP Deep Nuclear Waste Facility, which is supposed to be for US Defense related plutonium and other transuranic waste, but is being co-opted for foreign plutonium dumping, has continued to have problems with its ventilation system. It is effectively a salt mine. The US government’s apparently blinkered Blue Ribbon commission still has salt domes and salt beds on its hit list of places to stuff nuclear waste using the excuse that it was recommended in the 1950s. The below study discusses yet another reason that this is dangerous, besides the obvious that salt speeds up corrosion, and the less obvious instability of plutonium. This problem of mine gas would seemingly be even greater in old coal mining districts, such as Cumbria, where a deep nuclear waste facility has been proposed. Notice the CO2 occurence in Polish salt mines. Even where these are deep, properly mined, facilities, rather than burial…

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