Thinking About Dams << UPDATE! Calif. Dam has FAILED

In the previous post COMMENTS we were talking about the big dam fail in California.

From Mining Awareness

FICTION “The Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for most dams in the U.S.”

FACT State dam safety programs have oversight of most dams in the United States. State agencies regulate more than 80% of the Nation’s dams.

FICTION “Dams are like roads and bridges. The government takes care of them.”

FACT –  Most dams are privately owned. Dam owners are responsible for maintenance and upgrades. Private dam owners are responsible for more than 65% of the Nation’s dams. Many lack the financial resources necessary for adequate dam maintenance.

FICTION –  “There are only a few dams in my State.”

FACT –  There are more than 84,000 dams in the United States (as of 2010). Most States are home to hundreds—or thousands—of dams, and each must meet regulatory criteria. • Texas has the most dams—more than 7,000—followed by Kansas (6,087), Missouri (5,099), Oklahoma (4,755), and Georgia (4,606). • Mississippi, North Carolina, and Iowa each have more than 3,000 dams. • Five States—Alabama, Montana, Nebraska, South Carolina, and South Dakota—each have more than 2,000 dams. • Fifteen other States have more than 1,000 dams each. • Delaware has the fewest number of dams, with 86.

FICTION “That dam has been here for years—it’s not going anywhere.”

FACT –  Advancing age can make dams more susceptible to failure. The average age of dams in the United States is more than 53 years. As dams get older, deterioration increases and repair costs rise. Some common problems of older dams are: • Deteriorating metal pipes and structural components; metal rusts over time, and after 50 years it can fail completely. • Sediment-filled reservoirs. Some sediment may have contaminants from chemicals in runoff from upstream. • Runoff from subdivisions and businesses built upstream. Roofs and concrete streets and sidewalks increase the volume of runoff to the reservoir.

= = = = SUNDAY NIGHT NEWS = = = =

THE DAM HAS FAILED!

Evacuations ordered below Oroville Dam; failure of emergency spillway ‘expected’

LINK –  https://youtu.be/qaOwDSmiB44

LIVE COVERAGE KRCR :

orovmaps_gotoblk

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The World’s Most Dangerous Dams With Spectacular Possiblities From Our Planners Hovering Above Nuclear Plants

This is for Walter ….

“This will not be reported on major news channels, however  Lake Strom Thurmond, also known as Clarks Hill Lake in Georgia, is a reservoir at the border between Georgia and South Carolina in the Savannah River Basin. It was built between 1946 and 1954 by the Army Corps of Engineers at the confluence of the Little River and Savannah River. At 71,000 acres (287 km²), it is the 2nd largest artificial lake east of the Mississippi River. It was a shallow quake about 3 miles deep (the worst kind as far as damage goes). And it is reported to be 5.4, not 4.4 in magnitude. Make no mistake about it, failure of the Strom Thurmond Dam will place the Savannah River Power plant under a tidal wave and obliterate it.”

Dublinmick's Breaking News

We Interrupt Your Favorite Program To Report The 5.4 Quake Near Augusta Is Near The Thurmond Dam-Holding Back A Lake With 1200 Miles Of Shoreline Flowing Toward The Savannah River Nuclear Plant-The Vogtle Nuclear Plant Was About Ground Zero But No Damage Reported-Whew

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannah_River

Savannah River Augusta Canal Riverwatch Pkwy 2.jpg

This will not be reported on major news channels, however  Lake Strom Thurmond, also known as Clarks Hill Lake in Georgia, is a reservoir at the border between Georgia and South Carolina in the Savannah River Basin. It was built between 1946 and 1954 by the Army Corps of Engineers at the confluence of the Little River and Savannah River. At 71,000 acres (287 km²), it is the 2nd largest artificial lake east of the Mississippi River. It was a shallow quake about 3 miles deep (the worst kind as far as damage goes). And it is reported to be 5.4, not 4.4 in magnitude. Make no…

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